Read this, Not that

Here there be books. book reviews, pictures of books, articles about books and authors, movies based on books, reading, literature, book worms, contemporary fiction and the occasional bout of silliness.

“A room without a book is like a room without a soul.”
— Marcus Tullius Cicero
Recent Tweets @

bildstreifen:

at Ampersand Cafe and Bookstore

(via books-cupcakes)

I do think that a bookshelf is a rather complete image of a person. When I enter someone’s home, I always look at their books first.
Lovis Caputo (via openbookstore)

(via robbielei)

artchipel:

Lori Nix - The City | Library (2007)

[found at Juxtapoz]

(via genderisasocialconstruction)

afrofuturistaffair:

Books on Science Fiction and Black Speculative Critical Analysis

1. The Black Imagination: Science Fiction, Futurism and the Speculative (Black Studies and Critical Thinking) (2011) by Sandra Jackson - This critical collection covers a broad spectrum of works, both literary and cinematic, and issues from writers, directors, and artists who claim the science fiction, speculative fiction, and Afro-futurist genres.

2. Black Space: Imagining Race in Science Fiction Film (2008) by Adilifu Nama - The first book-length study of African American representation in science fiction film, Black Space demonstrates that SF cinema has become an important field of racial analysis, a site where definitions of race can be contested and post-civil rights race relations (re)imagined.

3. Race in American Science Fiction (2011) by Isiah Lavender III - Race in American Science Fiction offers a systematic classification of ways that race appears and how it is silenced in science fiction, while developing a critical vocabulary designed to focus attention on often-overlooked racial implications. These focused readings of science fiction contextualize race within the genre’s better-known master narratives and agendas.

4. Horror Noire: Blacks in American Horror Films from 1890s to Present (2011) by Robin Means Coleman - Horror Noire presents a unique social history of blacks in America through changing images in horror films. Throughout the text, the reader is encouraged to unpack the genre’s racialized imagery, as well as the narratives that make up popular culture’s commentary on race. Offering a comprehensive chronological survey of the genre, this book addresses a full range of black horror films, including mainstream Hollywood fare, as well as art-house films, Blaxploitation films, direct-to-DVD films, and the emerging U.S./hip-hop culture-inspired Nigerian “Nollywood” Black horror films.

(via thebiobabe)

therumpus:

What are your Rumblr editors reading this week? Well…

Molly: This morning I picked up Yeats’s Irish Fairy and Folk Tales, which I bought in San Francisco last February, and which has been on my bedside table since then. Yeats’s introduction is pitch perfect (pretty shady, pretty spooky) and the first few stories have already picked me up and carried me through the scrim of the world. There’s something that feels very bodily real about Irish stories of the Good People: magic is matter of fact. I feel I should leave a dish of milk on my windowsill tonight.

LucyI am reading Lost Memory of Skin by Russell Banks, the story of a young Floridian sex offender working out the world, and his place in it, from under a causeway. Kid, as he is called, is approached by the Professor, as he is called, a sociologist studying homelessness with some well-veiled ulterior motives. Perhaps. Banks is a gut-searing writer, and I can’t decide if it’s more wrenching to read this book or to put it down.

JenI’m reading Where’d You Go, Bernadette? by Maria Semple. My plan was to read this on my vacation last week because it seemed perfect to pickup on a bus, plane, wherever. I only used it to lean on while writing postcards. I started reading it this week—it’s funny and does seem like it would have been perfect while on vacation.

afrofuturistaffair:

Books on Science Fiction and Black Speculative Critical Analysis

1. The Black Imagination: Science Fiction, Futurism and the Speculative (Black Studies and Critical Thinking) (2011) by Sandra Jackson - This critical collection covers a broad spectrum of works, both literary and cinematic, and issues from writers, directors, and artists who claim the science fiction, speculative fiction, and Afro-futurist genres.

2. Black Space: Imagining Race in Science Fiction Film (2008) by Adilifu Nama - The first book-length study of African American representation in science fiction film, Black Space demonstrates that SF cinema has become an important field of racial analysis, a site where definitions of race can be contested and post-civil rights race relations (re)imagined.

3. Race in American Science Fiction (2011) by Isiah Lavender III - Race in American Science Fiction offers a systematic classification of ways that race appears and how it is silenced in science fiction, while developing a critical vocabulary designed to focus attention on often-overlooked racial implications. These focused readings of science fiction contextualize race within the genre’s better-known master narratives and agendas.

4. Horror Noire: Blacks in American Horror Films from 1890s to Present (2011) by Robin Means Coleman - Horror Noire presents a unique social history of blacks in America through changing images in horror films. Throughout the text, the reader is encouraged to unpack the genre’s racialized imagery, as well as the narratives that make up popular culture’s commentary on race. Offering a comprehensive chronological survey of the genre, this book addresses a full range of black horror films, including mainstream Hollywood fare, as well as art-house films, Blaxploitation films, direct-to-DVD films, and the emerging U.S./hip-hop culture-inspired Nigerian “Nollywood” Black horror films.

(via spikeghost)

jeremyloverobsessedmoi:

To all my followers who are feeling blue or down…

jeremyloverobsessedmoi:

To all my followers who are feeling blue or down…

(via swingsetindecember)

Should Cap, as Vulture suggests, be more old-fashioned in his attitudes on gender, race or sexuality? I’m inclined to think not. For one, World War II saw massive social upheaval in both the first two categories, and we’ve already seen Cap work alongside a strong, authoritarian woman, so it seems weird that he’d suddenly have a problem with that. He’s also well established as both an underdog himself and a champion of same, so it would be strange for him to suddenly take a stance against tolerance. Rogers is not a man desperate to prove himself; he remains the same kid that he was underneath, trying to do what he feels is right rather than subscribing to some outside notion of machismo that demands he also be sexist or homophobic or something. And aside from any questions of decency and responsible filmmaking, from a storytelling point of view it would be endlessly distracting if Cap suddenly started making homophobic statements or patting passing women on the butt (he wasn’t exactly a ladykiller in the ’40s; why would he suddenly turn boorish now?).

What’s important and interesting about Cap is exactly what some people dismiss as boring. It’s that decency and honesty and sense of moral authority. In a film world full of compromised characters, flawed protagonists and out-and-out anti-heroes, Steve Rogers is a breath of fresh air. Someone with no secrets, who literally wears his high ideals as a uniform and gets on with the job at hand, is far more interesting than any number of self-torturing, whiny man-children.

Why Do People Think Captain America Is Boring? (via chujo-hime)

There is something terribly wrong when people claim that Cap is boring because he’s not expressing contempt towards already marginalized people.  This always seems to happen when there is a character from previous era who wakes up in the modern world; someone always complains that they’re not “believable” or “interesting” enough if we can’t watch them be abusive to people.  

(via phoenix-ace)

(via libraryseraph)

captainofalltheships:

Chrys watches GoT [x]

(via swingsetindecember)

kenobi-wan-obi:

nobodylovesanihilist:

kenobi-wan-obi:

Are Millennials Sick and Tired of ‘Are Millennials’ News Titles?

"So what else do you do to the largest politicized tech savvy generation? You gaslight them, flood the media with news stories that victim blame us for our failures to not turn out to be good little capitalists. Lower our expectation so that $30,000 salaries begin to look good. Create movies and shows that shame young adults forced to move back with their parents because housing prices and wages are not aligned, what do you do other than to try to beat our confidence so that we numb ourselves with drugs, booze, sex, and mindless entertainment so we won’t connect the dots and put together that it’s the system that is fucked up–that capitalism is the crisis and it was the hippies turned yuppies that sold us out."

https://thisisbobbylondon.wordpress.com/

I see no lies though

ofcolor-fashion:

Irene Bedard

(via sikssaapo-p)

izanzanwin:

PLEASE SIGNAL BOOST: NATIVES, ALLIES, SOCIAL JUSTICE

UPDATE ON UND SITUATION:

Gamma phi beta has issued a genuine apology. They are going to start yearly cultural sensitivity and have offered to team up with American Indian Student Services to spread awareness about these issues…

Now it is time to redirect the conversation to the root of the problem. The main issues lie within institutional systemic systems. It is up to the university to implement changes. For example issuing statements explaining why the fighting sioux logo is harmful. So far all students know is that the NAACP forced the school to change it and the “indians took it away” from them. By the university continuing to remain silent they are complicit to the tension on campus.

Nick Creamer student body president is one of the main perpetrators creating divisive enviornments on campus. He has perpetuated support of the mascot and racism through the #rolltribe hash tag associating native identity with alcohol and native mascots. 
He threatened to veto the funding for the pow wow months ago.

wdaz.com/event/article/id/23621/ … This article shows the vindictive nature of Nick Creamer and others who are pro fighting sioux.

Nick Creamer has been threatening to veto the bill so that we cannot put on the annual wacipi/pow wow. Hes obv. pro fighting sioux


http://www.indianz.com/News/2013/012071.asp … … Here is the article from last semester which talks about the difficulty native org has with receiving funding from UND

Important to note that native orgs bring in millions. Its rumored that funding is 250,000 for a wiz kahlifa concert but creamer and his minions keep tweeting how out of line natives are for requesting additional 2k

He waited a week before the pow wow to veto funds for the buffalo feed. This strategy was sneaky because he had months to approve or disprove funds and he waited till last minute so native orgs could not appeal his decision in time to host the feed. This is clearly his retaliation for the retirement of the fighting sioux logo. The manner in which he responded to criticism displayed a complete lack of tact or integrity for someone who is student body president. He tweeted #fightingsiouxforever to trivialize the situation. He has his supporters trolling natives in #fundthefeed tag. Overall Nick Creamer is not a good representative for the student body (most def. not native students) and he is representing UND in a negative light. Last I heard he will face no repercussions for his actions. UND needs to be aware that this IS AN ISSUE. Nick Creamer has turned off his phone and has been avoiding his office so he doesnt have to meet with native students. There is no use trying to speak with him when his intentions are clear.

If you want to support  and native students at UND Please call http://und.edu/student-affairs/dean-of-students/  or http://und.edu/student-affairs/ and tell them how is negatively representing UND and needs to face consequences. Also inform them of the importance of cultural events such as the buffalo feed and how it speaks to diversity and inclusion.

(via sikssaapo-p)

america-wakiewakie:

— Presente